Insects Arthropods Arachnids

Medical Significance of the Class Arachnida Arthropoda

Medical Significance of the Class Arachnida Arthropoda : The class Arachnida is a group of more than 100,000 species, including spiders, scorpions, ticks, and mites. Most arachnids are adapted to kill prey with poison, stingers, or fangs. Like crustaceans, arachnids have a body that is divided into a cephalothorax and abdomen.

On the cephalothorax there are 4 pairs of legs, a pair of Chelicerae, and a pair of appendages called the pedipalps. The pedipalps help chew; in some species the pedipalps are specialized to perform other functions. Arachnids undergo incomplete metamorphosis. The class Arachnida includes 3 orders of medical importance:

1. Order the Scorpion
2. Order Araneae (spiders)
3. Order Acari (fleas and mites)

scorpion

Scorpions are a group of arachnids whose pedipalps are modified into pincers. Scorpions use these pincers to handle their food and tear it apart. The scorpion’s venomous sting is used primarily to electrocute its prey and less often to defend itself. The sting is located in the terminal segment of the body, which is slender towards the tip.

The scorpion’s elongated, jointed belly is its trademark; in most chelicerates, the abdominal segments are more or less fused together and appear as a single unit. Adults of this arachnid order range in size from 1 to 18 centimeters. There are about 1,200 species of scorpion, all terrestrial, living around the world, although they are common in the tropics, subtropics, and deserts.

The mating of scorpions is complicated, with the spermatophores fixed to the substrate by the male and then taken up by the female. The young are born alive, with 1 to 95 in a given liter. Scorpions differ from spiders in two ways. Scorpions have very large pedipalps, which they hold in a forward position.

They also have a large stinger in the last segment … Read more

How to Fill Your Non-Standard Honeycomb

How to Fill Your Non-Standard Honeycomb : When I started beekeeping at the turn of the century, the choice of hives in the UK was National or WBC or, if you have bigger ambitions, Commercial. Langstroth is seen as the undisputed American and anything made of straw is just a freak, and at worst, disaster waiting to happen.

Now, less than 20 years later, we also have the Warré, horizontal scion nest, Lazutin, ZEST and other inner boxes, and for hay lovers, some interesting variants for the skeptic. This has created two new problems for beginners: which hive to start with and how to lure bees into it.

In those days it was easy: National was the top choice because it was everywhere. Those who like the look of the WBC and don’t procrastinate on the extra work can still use the same frames, even if they are fewer in number. You pay around £25 for a nuc that is too cold and about double for a hive and in an instant you are a new beekeeper.

Somehow, in a few decades, the price of nuc doubled, and doubled again, and again, and the price of wood tools also increased, so that now there is a significant cost to start a beekeeping. If you follow the conventional route: you can expect to put down around £500 for a hive with bees and basic equipment.

If you take the road less traveled and build your own top bar hive – vertical or horizontal – you could definitely save money on hardware, but now you have another problem: how to get bees into your hive, given that a standard 5 frame core doesn’t. ‘T. will fit into your oddly shaped box, and matching nucs are as rare as chicken teeth.

When I … Read more