Seven Things You May Not Know About Your Own Cat

Longevity – It is said, give a cat three years for every human year and you have an idea of how old he is compared to us. Not so. A cat at one year old is capable of reproduction and fully able to take care of himself. A three year old human is helpless. Such mathematical formulas for understanding the ‘real’ age of an animal don’t work because their internal, and external developments vary and do not correspond to human development.

But did you know that the life span of cats seems to be increasing, from around twelve years or so several decades ago to eighteen or more and it seems now not uncommon for cats to live into their twenties? Not only advances in cat medicine but apparently in genetic changes as well are contributing to longer life and some cats live to be much older indeed. Several cats in Southern California have been reported to live as long as thirty and thirty four years.

Independent & Loners – Cats are thought to be solitary creatures by many, but anyone who has visited a farm where there are cats will find they congregate in colonies, sometimes nearing twenty in number and seem even to hunt together. There is little fighting because there is always one dominant cat which the others all accept, the rest being equal. At least until a new cat arrives and dominance must be re-established.

If you have an indoor/outdoor cat, as do I, you no doubt find him asking to be let out, even though he has his cat doors. Mine does daily, usually at night. I go to the door, open it and he eagerly runs into he mudroom, awaiting the opening of the next door, though both are equipped with cat doors. If

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Four Ways to Help Animals by Saving the Environment

In this time of industrial and technological advancement, our environment suffers each day greatly. From air pollution to deforestation to land pollution, these threats to our environment’s safety increases daily.

Four Ways to Help Animals by Saving the Environment

The environment is a natural habitat for animals, no matter what animal or habitat it is. On Collected.Reviews, there are various reviews about alternative energy networks between the environment and animals.

As nature has it, the environment is only friendly to the animals when it’s in excellent condition. Studies have shown that a lot concerning animals, such as health, feeding, and others, depends on the state of the environment around them. Different actions we can take as humans in saving the environment can protect animals.

Some of the actions we can take include:

·      Planting trees and discouraging deforestation:

The natural habitat of many animals, majorly wildlife, is filled with trees. Trees are an important part of the environment because they aid the oxygen production cycle in the environment. These trees strongly help the environment and the animals. Deforestation is an act of cutting down these trees for other reasons. By planting trees and warning against deforestation, the environment’s cycle of oxygen becomes smoother. Through this act of saving the environment, animals get to live in a conducive habitat with a plentiful supply of oxygen.

·      Recycling trash and keeping the environment clean:

As humans, we use many products that produce trash, such as nylons, plastics, glass, etc. These trash materials are not often biodegradable (they cannot decay naturally), therefore, making a defect in the environment by lying around. This way, animals can access these objects and be harmed. These objects are, however, recyclable, i.e., we can re-use them. By recycling these objects, the environment has fewer pollutants and obstacles in it. By this, the animals do not face … Read more

Raising Crickets for Fun and Profit

Crickets are one of the most popular foods for your reptiles and amphibian pets. They move around really fast and grab your pet’s attention. Crickets are very nutritious and you can provide your pets with as many as they can eat.

Adult crickets grow to around one inch in length. Male crickets are smaller than the females and can be spotted easily in a colony as they are the ones making the noise. You can tell the female crickets by their ovipositor i.e. a long needle like structure which is used to lay eggs.

I have raised crickets a number of times and found out these basic tips that will help you grow your own.

· Crickets need warmth.

· Crickets need food and water.

· Crickets need a place to lay eggs.

First thing you need is a container to store and breed your crickets; this can be a plastic storage container with a snap on lid. Take the lid and cut some 3 to 5 inch square holes out of it and hot glue some screen over the holes, this will provide ventilation for your crickets. Use some ground up corn cobs as a substrate for your habitat and put about an inch of this in your container.

Place your container in a warm area; you may have to provide something to warm them. Crickets like to be at about 85 degrees.

Make your own watering dish this can be as easy as a plastic lid from a peanut butter jar, cut a sponge to fit inside of the lid and soak it with water. You will have to add some water every couple of days.

Crickets need protein to eat, I would feed my crickets cheap dog food, corn meal and oat meal. Your crickets will also

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